Grief Expert Shirley Enebrad Releases New Book, Unveils New Website

Shirley Enebrad

Author and grief expert Shirley Enebrad releases new book

By Margo Myers, Margo Myers Communications

My friends Shirley Enebrad has a new book out, and given that the holidays can be a difficult time if you’ve lost a loved one, I highly recommend this book to help you cope with grief and loss!

SEATTLE, Oct. 17, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — Grief and loss counselor Shirley Enebrad is announcing the release of her newest book, Six Word Lessons on Coping with Grief; 100 Lessons to Help You and Your Loved Ones Deal with Loss. It provides practical lessons on coping with loss and overcoming grief. “Loss is one of the inevitabilities of life,” says Enebrad. “It is something all of us encounter, and there is no right or wrong way to grieve. This book can offer help with the emotions we all feel when faced with the loss of a family member or friend, or even the loss of a job or marriage.”

Enebrad became a certified grief and loss counselor after her young son, Cory, died from cancer. That experience and how she coped, taught Enebrad how vital it is to acknowledge one’s grief, and inspired her to work with others who have been touched by loss. “I want people to know they are not alone,” says Enebrad. “There is no time limit on grief, and most importantly, grieving is not a mental illness.”

Six Word Lessons on Coping with Grief; 100 Lessons to Help You and Your Loved Ones Deal with Loss examines the shock, denial and even guilt that people often encounter after a major loss. It’s already receiving praise from those in the medical and counseling fields.

Grief expert Shirley Enebrad releases new book

Grief expert Shirley Enebrad releases new book.

“Shirley Enebrad did not choose to share a meal at Grief’s table, but she did,” says Dr. Lawrence Lincoln, Medical Director of the Tucson Medical Center Hospice. “Amongst the unrequested wisdom gleaned from this repast is that Grief is best consumed in bite-sized morsels.  ‘Six Word Lessons’ is filled with easily digestible sustenance for the long return journey back to the living.”

“This primer on grief is practical, honest, and totally on the money about feelings, thoughts, and behaviors which are part of the human experience of grief and loss,” says Dr. Bill Womack, psychiatrist. “It also takes direct aim at the guilt experienced about ‘the need to talk about it.'”

Enebrad has also written Over the Rainbow Bridge, My son’s journey from here to Heaven, (2009) chronicling Cory’s story and how he inspired everyone whose lives he touched. Both of Enebrad’s books are available on Amazon, and her website, www.shirleyenebrad.com.

CONTACT: Margo Myers   Margo Myers Communications 206-604-4535, Email

About the author: Shirley Enebrad is an accomplished speaker and author of two books: Over the Rainbow Bridge (2009) and Six Word Lessons on Coping with Grief; 100 Lessons to Help You and Your Loved Ones Deal with Loss (2013). She is a Certified Grief Recovery Specialist, and conducts workshops for children, teens and adults. Enebrad is the recipient of the Jefferson Award for Outstanding Public Service and the Angel of Hospice award.

Comments

  1. I’ve just read the Time article to get a sumamry of the author’s thinking. As a clergyperson for almost 30 years, I’ve seen a number of people live through loss and grief in a variety of ways, and have done so myself. I have found that people often experience the feelings that Kubler-Ross’s identified (as well as others), but it is been clear to me for many years that we do not expereince those feelings in systematic stages, but rather in unpredictable roller-coaster fashion not unlike the oscillating graph shown on this site. My own (admittedly anectodatal) take on grief is that the plethora of intense feelings we typically have for some period of time are the psyche’s way of honoring the importance to us of the person (or job or marriage or ) that have been lost. Once we have done that to the degree each needs, we are ready to move on in our lives. What I continue to observe is that while the varieties of approaches to grief process described and debunked in the Time article are widespread in the culture, it is also the case that in practical terms our culture often leaves little space and time for grieving. People are routinely expected to be able to return to normal functioing, especially in the work world, within a week or two of a major loss as if nothing significant had happened. There seems to be a disconnect between the possibly over-developed psychological approach to the inner work of grief and an under-developed acknowledgement in the public world of the functional challenges that people in the early, intense time of grieving often face.

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